Updated February 10th 2022

Safety & Risk Awareness

Activities and Risks

Dog Sledding

Participating in backcountry/arctic travel, skiing, snowshoeing, Nordic skiing & dogsledding involves additional and specific risks, dangers and hazards of travelling in rugged alpine, backcountry or wilderness environments, including but not limited to: avalanches; changing weather conditions; exposed rock, earth, ice and other natural objects; trees, tree wells, tree stumps and forest deadfall; the condition of snow or ice on or beneath the surface; variations in the terrain which may create blind spots or areas of reduced visibility; variations in the surface or sub-surface; variable and difficult snow conditions; streams, creeks and exposed holes in the snowpack above streams or creeks; rocks, boulders, crevasses, cliffs, gullies and ravines; snowcat roads, road-banks or cut-banks; collision with natural or man-made objects adjacent to or on the trails; snow immersion; impact or collision with other dog sleds; violent and unexpected forces and movement which may aggravate previous injuries; dog bites; overturning of the sled; breakdown or failure of equipment; failure to act safely or within one’s own ability.

Snowshoeing

Participating in hiking, snowshoeing, backpacking and backcountry travel involves additional and specific risks, dangers and hazards including but not limited to: travel over extreme, mountainous or alpine terrain where fallen timber, branches, rocks, roots or other obstacles or hazards, steep slopes or unstable ground may cause falls; avalanches; travel on, through or beside snowfields, glaciers, crevasses, streams, creeks, rivers, ponds and lakes; miscellaneous health problems related to over-exposure to the sun, dehydration, food poisoning, insect bites, fatigue, stress, exertion, high altitude and lack of fitness; snow immersion; encounters with domestic animals including dogs, and wildlife, including bears and cougars; encounters with dangerous or poisonous flora and fauna; becoming lost or separated from one’s party or guide; slips, trips and falls; negligence of other person; negligent first aid.

Snowmobiling

Participating in snowmobiling, ATV Tour whether as operator of the vehicle or as a passenger, involves risks, dangers and hazards including, but not limited to: changing weather conditions and visibility; mechanical failure of the equipment; failure to control the speed or direction, stopping distances and turning radius of the vehicle; loss of balance; rolling or flipping the vehicles; changes or variation in the terrain used for the tour which may create blind spots or areas of reduced visibility; collision with other vehicles, equipment, structures, objects or persons; collision with exposed rock, snow, ice, earth, trees, tree wells, tree stumps, forest deadfall or other natural or man-made objects; avalanches; encounters with wildlife, including bears and cougars; travel on back-country roads and trails; becoming lost or separated from the guides, instructors or other participants; slips, trips and falls; failing to act safely or within one’s own ability or remain within designated areas; negligence of other persons.

Ice Fishing

Ice Fishing involves risks, dangers, and hazards which are not limited to: slips, trips and falls; falling through the ice; changing weather; changing temperatures; drowning; hypothermia; exposure to water and sun; hidden and submerged objects; negligence of other persons.

Canoeing

Participating in Water Activities involves many risks, dangers and hazards including but not limited to: slips, trips and falls; falling off kayaks, canoes or paddle boards; changing weather; high wind; lightning; impact or collision with other vessels or objects in the water, other watercraft, rocks, trees, logs, deadfall, docks or shore walls; strain on joints, neck or spine; overturning or upsetting of kayaks, canoes or paddle boards; entrapment by trees, logs, or equipment; drowning; hypothermia; exposure to water and sun; exposure to infectious disease contracted through viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi which may be transmitted through direct or indirect contact; and negligence of other persons.

Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife viewing involves risks, dangers, and hazards which are not limited to: encounters with domestic, caged, or wild animals including bears and cougars.

For each activity you will need to sign a RELEASE OF LIABILITY AND WAIVER AGREEMENT – please find below a sample waiver. Each waiver may vary depending on the operator. Feel free to reach out to us if you have any questions.

Download release form
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